Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Obama: Here I Was, All Excited, Then...

I read this:
"At a certain point I've just concluded that for me, personally, it is important for me to go ahead and affirm that I think same-sex couples should be able to get married."
Thanks... I guess?

This issue is so important for the President of the United States that, golly gosh darn he's going to go ahead and affirm that people that love one another deserve to get married???  Sure, I think he's finally "come out" on our side, but good grief, does anyone else think he sounds like Lumbergh from "Office Space"?

All joking aside, this is typical of modern politicians.  And I'm really, really trying to see this from his perspective.  No matter what the man says on the issue, it'll be used against him one way or another in the next election.  But come ON!  The LBGT community, as well as most liberals, have been waiting for well over 20 years for a high-profile figure from the Democratic party to stand up against a very vocal, and very well funded conservative political machine.  Yet an affirmation is all we get.

I think we've reached a point in our history where liberals have to stop being polite.  We have to begin to ask ourselves, at what point will we finally band together to combat the people that are so willing to take away the rights of others?  When will our society reach the point where bigots no longer get to dictate public policy, no matter how vast their number?

Do you still not understand my point?  Okay.  Let's try an experiment.  How about I rephrase the President's remarks like this:

"At a certain point I've just concluded that for me, personally, it is important for me to go ahead and affirm that I think women should be able to vote."

Or how about this:

"At a certain point I've just concluded that for me, personally, it is important for me to go ahead and affirm that I think black people should have the same rights as white people."

Got it?

2 comments:

  1. While I can understand your point, I think you've missed something. The President is affiliated with an evangelical xian congregation, the pastor of which is considered Mr. Obama's mentor. This pastor, Joel Hunter, advised the President to *not* take this stance [http://wapo.st/LR6gER].

    Mr. Obama displayed a courage of conviction in an election year unlike anything we have ever witnessed. By making those rather mild statements, he distinguished himself as the first candidate for any national office unwilling to oppose same-sex marriage. This should have a tremendous impact on politics for a very long time.

    It may have also cost him reelection.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I appreciate the comment!

    To me, it shouldn't matter that there's a pastor that's considered the President's mentor. If that pastor is wrong and a bigot, which I believe he is, then real courage would be to stand up against him as other courageous people have done throughout our history. This statement from the President just doesn't seem that courageous to me.

    I really do hope you're right - that this will have an impact on politics for a long time. As I said, I'm really trying to put myself in his shoes. But when we're talking about people's civil rights, I'm not sure a statement this benign will be enough to push back against the stranglehold that Christianity has unjustly seized on the right to marry.

    I guess we'll have to wait and see.

    ReplyDelete